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Six years ago, I was honored to serve on a bipartisan committee with then-Executive Councilor Chris Sununu and other New Hampshire leaders. Our mission was to tackle the growing opportunity gap so that every child could have a fair chance to succeed. Although our work was far from complete, I found the future governor to be engaged and open-minded, more focused on evidence than ideology. He reminded me of leading New Hampshire Republicans with whom I worked during my career in government reform, including the late Sen. Warren Rudman and Gov. Walter Peterson.

Then he ran for higher office in the party of Donald Trump. …


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Children and staff pose in front of a solar array for the Manchester Boys & Girls Club (ReVision Energy)

I recently sat down with the Board of a local nonprofit that works with low-income kids here in Southern New Hampshire. The topic was solar. The goal was cutting costs and carbon pollution on behalf of the children they serve.

The Board members wanted to know why my company, an employee-owned Benefit Corporation that brings solar to schools and nonprofits, was proposing to put panels on only half their spacious roof. Why, when more solar should mean more savings and environmental gain, would we want a smaller job? …


Today is Independence Day. Like many a Fourth of July gone by, my family and I will be celebrating with burgers and dogs and a side of democracy, as we remember the timeless Declaration of our Founding Fathers that “all men are created equal” and that governments derive “their just power from the consent of the governed.”

But something is different this year. Besides the cancellation of most fireworks and parades on account of the pandemic, America is in the midst of a deeper reckoning with racism that shakes the very foundations of “equality” and “consent” so many of us take for granted. Embedded in the burgeoning Movement for Black Lives are two fundamental questions: Is the democracy we celebrate today worthy of its name? …


What if I told you the sad and ignorant man who called my wife the N-word in New Hampshire isn’t really the problem? What if I said that well-mannered “white” folk like you and me are just as much the problem as he? Let me explain.

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How can I protect my two “black“ boys from the racism in which I partake?

The term “structural racism” is redundant. Racism didn’t start as an idea about individual biology, hardwired into crooked minds like his from the beginning. It started as a structure, a set of policies established by powerful people to increase their wealth and power. Its perpetrators happened to come from Europe and have lighter skin. …


One of our kids’ favorite bedtime stories involves a melancholy beaver with a fever. On each of the brightly-colored pages, one creaturely friend after another offers a source of comfort, from cool cloths to nourishing soup. Like any good children’s book, it ends on a happy note as the little beaver is revived and cheerfully exclaims, “The best medicine of all is my friends!”

Parenting would be easy if all I had to do was read my kids happy beaver stories. But alas, even three-year-olds can tell when something is awry — and they do not hesitate to ask “Why?”

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Which got me thinking about furry friends and fevers — both personal and planetary — to try and explain the Coronavirus to my children. …


A strange thing happened the other night in Manchester, New Hampshire. At a NH Democratic Party dinner featuring all ten Democratic candidates ahead of Tuesday’s First-in-the-Nation presidential primary, a boisterous crowd of Bernie Sanders supporters tried to shout down Pete Buttigieg with chants of “Wall Street Pete!”

It was a striking, if momentary, interruption to an otherwise genial affair, in which one Democratic official after another appealed for party unity to defeat Donald Trump. Even the crowd of yellow-clad Buttigieg supporters standing opposite the “Bernie bros” greeted their candidate’s chief rival, Sen. Sanders, with polite applause.

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Mayor Pete Buttigieg addressing New Hampshire Democrats on Saturday at SNHU Arena in Manchester, N.H.

But perhaps I shouldn’t have been surprised by the disruption. In recent weeks, a rising drumbeat of social media attacks has sought to paint Buttigieg as beholden to the Billionaire Class, Big Banks, Big Oil, or all of the above. Their effect has been to instill doubt in the minds of undecided voters as to whether Buttigieg can be trusted to fight the big fights — from climate to healthcare to inequality — that Democrats rightfully demand. …


According to the polls, one of four candidates in the still-sprawling field of Democratic presidential contenders will be the party’s nominee. Three are senators and a former Vice President who everyone expected to make the final cut; the fourth is a thirty-something mayor with a funny name you never heard of until this year.

With less than three months to go until the first ballots are cast in Iowa and New Hampshire, Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Indiana is upending the political establishment with a level of grassroots momentum that candidates with far more name recognition are struggling to muster. …


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Photo by Thomas Ehling on Unsplash

A strange thing happened recently. On Friday, March 15th, an estimated 1.6 million kids in over 120 countries walked out of school in a coordinated strike. It wasn’t a strike for better textbooks or longer recess or a tastier lunch. All they wanted was for their parents and politicians to stop burning down the house.

Their message was summed up by a 16-year old activist and Nobel Prize nominee named Greta Thunberg of Sweden. …

About

Daniel Weeks

Husband, Father, Citizen / Co-Owner & Director at ReVision Energy / Chair of Open Democracy. SDG

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